Anti-Drug Coalition of Tuscarawas County

www.adc-tusc.com

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About Us

 


The Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services (ADAMHS) Board of Tuscarawas and Carroll Counties received a grant from the Ohio Department of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services (ODADAS) to design and implement a strategic prevention framework. The goal of the project is:

To create a coalition of public, private and citizen stakeholders charged with influencing policies and developing programs and services which will reduce substance abuse by the residents of Tuscarawas and Carroll Counties.

Developing a strategic prevention framework requires cross-system, community-wide collaboration. It should build upon the strengths and successes that organizations and systems have established in the community and it must focus on shared goals and measurable outcomes. Early conversations about the project explored the options of conducting a shared two-county process which would bring Carroll and Tuscarawas stakeholders together in a single approach or maintaining separate county identities by running parallel and independent processes. It was recommended that separate planning processes, strategic prevention frameworks and community coalitions be established for each county.

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In The News

 


Ohio "Pill Mill" Doc Gets Life In Prison

By  Kathy Lynn Gray

The Columbus Dispatch Wednesday February 15, 2012

CINCINNATI — Send a clear message that doctors who sell drugs for profit will be punished, a mother whose son died because of drug addiction urged a federal judge yesterday.

U.S. District Judge Sandra S. Beckwith did just that, sentencing the former doctor at the heart of Scioto County’s “pill mill” epidemic to prison for life, four times over. She also ordered him to forfeit $1.2 million from his bank accounts.

“This defendant has no remorse, no insight into his own behavior, and he is a truly dangerous man,” Beckwith told Paul H. Volkman as he rocked back and forth in his courtroom chair during a contentious sentencing hearing.

Volkman responded by chastising the judge for “sentencing an innocent man to death in jail.” He called her a “heinous criminal.”

With his long white beard, bushy white eyebrows and graying hair, the 65-year-old Volkman could have passed for a department-store Santa Claus if he’d been in a red suit. Instead, he wore chains and orange-and-tan striped jail scrubs as he continued to proclaim his innocence in the federal courtroom.

A jury found Volkman guilty in May of numerous counts of prescribing painkillers illegally, including four counts involving deaths, when he ran clinics in Portsmouth and Chillicothe from 2003 to 2006. He also was found guilty of being part of a conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance, operating drug premises and possessing a gun while drug trafficking.

At least three members of the jury returned to court yesterday for the sentencing.

Volkman, whose license to practice medicine in Ohio has since been revoked, prescribed millions of doses of painkillers and raked in an estimated $3.8 million, according to court records.

“I have no regrets about my treatment and no apologies to make,” he said yesterday.

Many of his prescriptions were filled in Columbus by pharmacist Harold Eugene Fletcher at the East Main Street Pharmacy, 1336 E. Main St. Fletcher pleaded guilty to unlawfully distributing oxycodone and filing false income-tax returns and was sentenced last month to two years in prison and a year on house arrest.

Paula Eastley’s son Steven C. Hieneman died in 2005 at age 33 after filling a prescription that Volkman gave him for pain medications. She told Volkman during her victim’s statement yesterday that he preyed on addicts, “fed their addiction” and “made the sick sicker,” all for his own gain.

“He kept the Scioto County coroner busy with dead bodies of young men and women in their teens, 20s and 30s,” Eastley said.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Adam Wright said that a just punishment for Volkman would be “four life sentences to reflect the four lives that Mr. Volkman took.”

Jim Geldhof, diversion program manager for the Detroit office of the federal Drug Enforcement Administration, said he was gratified by Volkman’s sentence.

“It sends a message to doctors and pharmacists that you have to pay the price if you engage in this practice,” Geldhof said. “It also sends a message to the people of Portsmouth who have been so involved in trying to take back their town from pill mills.”

Volkman was a pediatrician and an emergency-room physician for 30 years in Cleveland, Toledo, Columbus and Chicago before he began working at a pain-pill clinic run by Denise Huffman in 2003. Huffman and her daughter Alice Huffman Ball pleaded guilty to operating an illegal pain-pill clinic and testified against Volkman.

Ball was sentenced in November to five years in prison. Yesterday, Beckwith sentenced Huffman to 12 years and eight months in prison.

The investigations of Volkman and Fletcher were handled by a number of agencies, including the DEA, FBI, Ohio Board of Pharmacy, State Medical Board of Ohio, Portsmouth police and 12 other federal, state and local law-enforcement departments in Ohio, Kentucky and Illinois.

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Parental Alert

 


Check out the link below for important information regarding dangerous energy drinks and alcohol trends! 
 
http://now.msn.com/living/0302-fake-four-loko.aspx

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Don't Get Me Started!

 


Director Orman Hall, of the Ohio Department of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services (ODADAS), in partnership with the Ohio Association of County Behavioral Health Authorities (OACBHA), announced the launch of Don’t Get Me Started, a statewide public service campaign that speaks to young adults and their friends and families regarding the Prescription Opiate Abuse Epidemic in Ohio.  The Don’t Get Me Started campaign continues the state’s successful efforts to address the growing problem of prescription drug addiction, as accidental drug overdose has been the leading cause of injury death inOhio for the past five years.    

 

Don’t Get Me Started directs residents to www.dontgetmestartedohio.org where viewers can watch videos from actual Ohioans whose lives have been significantly impacted by prescription drug addiction.  The site also features an interactive map of local Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Boards; a link to treatment options in each county; information about opiate abuse epidemic around the state; and links to other partners in the war on drugs. 

 

The campaign also features a dedicated Facebook page that will provide useful information on the state’s opiate abuse epidemic; including localized treatment and support resources and serve as a sounding board for those touched by opiate abuse to engage with the campaign and share their stories with others. 

 

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Drug Information

 


Commonly abused prescription drugs

Vicodin
Oxycontin
Oxycodone
Percocet
Dilaudid
Fentanyl
Xanax
Klonopin
Demerol
Subutex
Ritalin
Adderral
Vyvanse
Morphine Sulfate (MS Contin)
Norco
Soma
Valium
Ativan
Ambien
Suboxone
Codeine Phosphate , Tylenol with Codeine (Tylenol #3)
Narcotic containing cough syrups (Robitussin AC, Tussionex, Hycodan)
Ultram

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Alarming Trend

 


Energy Drinks result in an increase in Emergency Department Visits

Between 2005 and 2009, Emergency Department (ED) visits involving Energy Drinks increased from 1,128 to 13,114.  According to an article printed in The Dawn Report, published by the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), approximately half of the energy drink related ED visits made by patients aged 18-25 involved combinations of energy drinks with alcohol or other drugs. 

Consumption of energy drinks is a rising public health problem because medical and behavioral consequences can result from excessive caffeine intake.  The total caffeine in an energy drink ranges from 80 to more than 500 milligrams of caffeine, compared to about 100 mg of caffeine in a cup of coffee or 50 mg in a can of soda.  Associations have been established between energy drink consumption and problematic behaviors such as marijuana use, sexual risk taking, fighting, smoking, drinking and prescription drug misuse.  Also, individuals may incorrectly believe that consumption of caffeine can “undo” the effects of alcohol intake and make it safe to drive after drinking.   Excessive caffeine intake from energy drinks may cause arrhythmias, hypertension and dehydration, in addition to sleeplessness and nervousness.  Use over time can cause dependence and withdrawal symptoms.  Drinking and driving can be facilitated by mixing energy drinks with other substances such as alcohol.

Public awareness focusing on the health effects of energy drink consumption is needed to educate the public about the risks associated with consumption alone and in combination with alcohol and/or pharmaceuticals.  Given the finding that one in six visits involved energy drinks in combination with alcohol, public awareness campaigns could also help dispel the misguided belief that energy drinks can offset or eliminate the effects of alcohol intoxication.  

To view the entire article click on the link below:

http://www.samhsa.gov/data/2k11/WEB_DAWN_089/WEB_DAWN_089_HTML.pdf

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Contact Us

 


For more information or how to become involved with the Anti-Drug Coalition of Tuscarawas County contact the Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services (ADAMHS) Board at:

(330) 364-6488

or visit the website at:

www.adc-tusc.com

The Anti-Drug Coalition meets the first Friday of each month at the ADAMHS Board office:

1260 Monroe Street NW, 27N

New Philadelphia, Ohio 44663

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Links

 


Listed below are links to various organizations and informational resources that support demand reduction (law enforcement), prevention and/or treatment of addictive disorders.  These are various State of Ohio, federal, local public and private agencies that play a role in equipping communities to reduce alcohol and drug related problems. 

Their roles may vary, however improving the health and safety of our community requires a high degree of collaboration and information sharing.  This cooperation is a primary goal of our local coalition as we attempt to improve public policy in response to the growing problem of drug addiction and its consequences.  Please take an opportunity to read these reports and visit the agency websites. 

Listed below are links to various organizations and informational resources that support demand reduction (law enforcement), prevention and/or treatment of addictive disorders.  These are various State of Ohio, federal, local public and private agencies that play a role in equipping communities to reduce alcohol and drug related problems. 

Their roles may vary, however improving the health and safety of our community requires a high degree of collaboration and information sharing.  This cooperation is a primary goal of our local coalition as we attempt to improve public policy in response to the growing problem of drug addiction and its consequences.  Please take an opportunity to read these reports and visit the agency websites. 

 

Ohio Substance Abuse Monitoring

Ohio Department of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services

Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America

National Institute on Drug Abuse

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

University of Cincinnati Center for Prevention Studies

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
(Centers for Substance Abuse Treatment and Prevention)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Office of National Drug Control Policy

High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTA) Program

Ohio Association of County Behavioral Health Authorities

Buckeye State Sheriffs’ Association

Ohio Association of Chiefs of Police

National Association of State Alcohol/Drug Abuse Directors

The Ohio Council of Behavioral Health and Family Services Providers

National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University

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